Offensive Transition

Offensive Strategies

CAUTION: Before undertaking any offense, you must fully understand and master all of its components.

Whether you are an NBA head coach, a little dribbler's coach, or just an interested spectator, you'll find HoopTactics' Offensive Strategies a very valuable resource. Learn how to master proven offensive sets along with their counter options, and to understand the strategies behind them that make them so successful. HoopTactics offensive presentations go well beyond just the basic play action. They include defensive reads & counters adjustments, automatic options against defensive over-plays, ball reversals, and continuities along with variations & adaptations. HoopTactics offensive presentations will definitely increase your offensive basketball knowledge, expertise, and success. Begin by choosing one of the offensive strategies below.<

| Early Offense | Set Offenses | Motion Offenses | Spread Offenses | Zone Offenses | Combination Offenses |Offensive Situations |

Offensive Transition

Early Offense

The main reason for early offense is to advance the ball into the front court area and attack before the defense is able to become organized into a disruptive force. In advancing the ball into the offensive operating area quickly, it creates quick medium jump shots, or penetration lay-ups, or kick out passes along with severe mismatches. Explore in detail the three phases of an early offense.

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Why the Need for Early Offense?

The main reason for early offense, accompanied by flow action, is to force the defense to react rather than act! This simply put is to advance the ball quickly into the front court areas and attack before the defense is able to become organized into a disruptive force.

As defensive specialists over the many years of coaching, we have found the most difficult teams to defend were the ones with offenses that pushed the ball into the front court hash mark areas in the time span of 2 to 3 seconds. This early offense push creates quick medium jump shots, or penetration lay-ups, or kick out passes for scores to occur before the defense had a chance to set up and disrupt any organized set play.

We have also found that when teams walked the ball up the court, they were much easier to defend because the defense was able to get its players back into positions near the basket were they could execute pressure denials, traps to disrupt the offensive flow and to force rushed shots as time on the clock became a factor.

Early offense is Composed of Three Phases

These three phases include an initial early push, a continuous flow into an early set, and concluding with a continuity style of play. The initial push phase into offense end of the court before the defense can get organized and established, creates not only out numbered situations, but severe mismatches as well. However, when the early push does not create a good shot or advantage it is important to move right into the offensive flow phase without allowing the defense to set up. If the early flow set does not produce a good shot or an advantage, it is important to move right into the third and final phase with a continuity style of play as the shot clock winds down.

Flow Diagram

Early Offense Flow Chart

To examine each phase of the early offense, click the desired button below.

Early Push  Early Flow  Early Continuity

 

Learn More Keys to Winning with Early Offense

Learn More Early Offense: Thoughts to Consider

Learn More Installing an Early Offense

Learn More Case for the Defense - Defensive Transition

 

Set Offenses

Set Offenses

Although most teams would prefer to play the up-tempo, fast-break transition game that personifies today's basketball, the "Set Play" is the staple of the game. Set plays use teamwork and screening actions in an effort to create open shots. Explore the most commonly used basketball offenses graphically illustrated and analyzed in great detail.

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Most Commonly Used Set Offenses

Whether you are an NBA head coach, a little dribbler's coach, or just an interested spectator, you'll find HoopTactics complete guide to the most commonly used basketball offenses a very valuable resource. Each offense is graphically illustrated and analyzed in great detail. Though most teams would prefer to play the more exciting, oftentimes breathtaking, fast break transition game that personifies today's basketball, the "Set Play" is the staple of the game.

Learn from the great masters how to recognize these various proven offensive sets along with their various options, and to understand the successful strategies behind them.

Click on desired Offense below to view graphically Illustrated play details.

Base Cross Button

Base Cross

ucla

UCLA

Triangle Post

Triangle Post

side screen

Side Screen

Zipper

Zipper

Mid Screen

Mid Screen

Horns

Horns

Hawk

Hawk

Power

Power

High Post

High Post Split

Single/Double

Single/Double

 

Motion Offenses

Motion Offenses

Through constant player movement, teams of average size and abilities can overcome and defeat teams of superior talent and size. However, this requires players to play together as a single unit. More importantly, it requires players to possess an unselfish attitude to create open shot opportunities for their teammates. This constant player movement must have purpose and patience in attacking the defense.

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Motion Offenses

When teams are not blessed with super stars or big players, they must rely on a total team effort in order to be successful. Through teamwork, teams of average size and abilities can overcome and defeat teams of superior talent and size. However, this requires not only that players play together as a single unit; but more importantly, possess an unselfish attitude and work ethic to create open shots opportunities for their teammates. Here are a variety of motion offenses that have been proven to be very successful over the years.

Click on desired motion offense below to view graphically illustrated play details.

Reverse Action

Reverse Action

Triangle Game

Triangle Game

Shuffle

Shuffle

Side Screen

SideScreen

Princeton

Princeton

Passing Game

Passing Game

Flex

Flex Offense

 

Spread Offenses

Spread Offenses

Spread offenses are normally deployed at the end of game to protect a hard earned lead, or when a team is totally mismatched. By spreading the court, it not only takes time off the clock, but also increases the area the defense must defend. However, in spreading the court, teams must make sure to continue to make basket cuts and attack the basket. Holding the ball for the sake of trying to run time off the clock will allow the defense to become more aggressive and disruptive.

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Protecting a Valuable Lead

When ahead late in the game the clock becomes your ally; however, you must use it wisely. Keep it running and do not stop it (unless in very serious trouble). Coaches may elect to spread the court on offense to take time off the clock and cut down on the number of opponent's offensive possessions. However, if you do so, be sure to continue to make basket cuts and attack the basket. Holding the ball for the sake of trying to run time off the clock will allow the defense to get more aggressive and disruptive. You must attack the basket. Here are several highly successful and proven spread court offenses:

Click on desired Spread Offensive graphic below to view illustrated details.

Cat

CAT

Ice

ICE

Stack

STACK

4 Corners

FOUR CORNERS

Spread

SPREAD

Give & Go

GIVE & GO

Drive & Kick

DRIVE & KICK

Four Down

FOUR LOW

Zone Offenses

Proven Zone Offenses

The need for a solid zone attack is paramount on every level of the game. Attacking zone defenses requires ball movement and total team effort compared to the player movement and individual skills required in attacking man-to-man defenses. Good outside shooting, early offense (fast breaks) and offensive rebounding are key elements to a successful zone offense.

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Attacking Zone Defenses

Do not leave attacking zones up to chance.

The need for a solid zone attack is paramount on every level of the game. Attacking man to man defenses and zone defenses are two distinct endeavors. Attacking man to man defenses requires player movement and individual skills; whereas, in attacking zone defenses ball movement and a total team effort is involved. Therefore, before under taking any specific zone offense, coaches and players must have a working knowledge of the basic principles and techniques required to successfully combat zone defenses.

Click on desired Zone Offense to view graphically Illustrated play details.

      

Clock

Clock

Stack

Stack

High/Low

High/Low

Iowa

Iowa

Slice

Slice

 .

Learn More Principles for Attacking Zone Defenses

Learn More Zone Defenses Reads & Counters

 

Defensive Chaser

Combination Offenses

Since combination offenses are secondary offenses, it is important to keep them simple and easy for players to learn. It is also helpful, if the combination offenses being used are similar to an already used offense. Since combination defenses are primarily deployed to deny and limit the "touches" of an outstanding players, any offensive attack must be designed to counter this overplay and free up the scorer(s). Be alert and prepared since combination defenses are commonly deployed as a surprise tactic.

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Attacking Combination Defenses

Combination defenses can be very devastating to any team not prepared to attack them. Combination defenses are primarily deployed to deny and limit the "touches" of an outstanding offensive player(s). They are also deployed as a surprise tactic. Like all defenses, combination defenses have their strengths and weakness. However, timing and surprise is the most critical factor to their success. The most commonly used combination defenses include: Box & One, Diamond & One, and Triangle & Two.

Click on desired Combination Offense to view graphically Illustrated play details.

Box & One Offenses

The most commonly used combination defense is the "Box and One." In this particular defense four defensive players play a box zone guarding areas while one player (the "Chaser") assumes an aggressive, full out pass denial position on the opponent's outstanding, offensive player.

Box & 1 Chase

Chase

Box & 1 Back

Flash

Box & 1 Horns

Horns

Box & 1 Pound Cake

Pound Cake

Diamond & One Offenses

A "Diamond & One" combination defense, similar to the Box & One, is primarily deployed to deny and limit the "touches" of outstanding scorer. The diamond zone alignment allows the defense to match up with a single guard front. Although the diamond and one is very effective in taking away the middle, it does give up the corners. Although, less commonly used than the Box & One combination defense, it can be very devastating to any team not prepared to attack it.

Clock

Clock

Box & 1 Back

Back Cut

Triangle

Triangle

Triangle & Two Offenses

The "Triangle & Two" defense can be an effective weapon when the opponents have two outstanding scorers or just as a change of defense to catch an opponent off guard. It can also be used at the end of the game when a team is trying to hold the ball.

Single/Double

Single/Double

Stack

Stack

Rotation

Rotation

 

Offensive Situations

Offensive Situations

Discover that winning of "BIG" games and championships are not a matter of chance. They are a result of being prepared down to the smallest detailed. Out of bounds, free throws, press breaks, attacking combination defenses, jump balls, and last shot situations all need to be addressed. End of game situations and clock management really become paramount late in the season when a single shot can determine a team’s playoff fate.

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Offensive Situations

"You must be prepared to be a winner." -- John Wooden

Winning of "BIG" games and championships are not a matter of chance. They are a result of being prepared down to the smallest detailed. Do your homework. Do not ever expect your players to execute anything during a game that you have not covered in practice.

Click on the desired offensive situation below to view details.

Learn More Out of Bounds Guidelines

Out of Bounds Rules Self-Quiz

Learn More Proven Baseline Out of Bounds Plays

Learn More Proven Sideline Out of Bounds Plays

Learn More Full Court Last Shot Out of Bounds Plays

 

Learn More Press Break

Learn More Protecting a Hard Earned Lead

Learn More Last Shot Situations

Learn More End of Period Last Shot Guidelines

 

Learn More Successfully Attacking Out Numbered Situations

Learn More Proven Jump Ball Plays

Learn More Attacking "Combination Defenses"